UNITY

Creating Cutting-Edge Technology With a Purpose

Noelle LaCharite

Noelle LaCharite freely admits that she’s a “little different than your average bear.” This might be a bit of an understatement considering her successful 20-plus year career in the IT engineering field, coupled with a strong desire to use her admirable skillsets to enhance the Unity movement and spread the message of positive, practical Christianity.

LaCharite, an Alexa evangelist and solutions architect at Amazon in Seattle, is the person behind the new and innovative Unity launch into voice-enabled technology using Alexa-enabled devices such as the Amazon Echo—Amazon’s top-selling home speaker.

A Snapshot From the Past: The Birth of Unity

One hundred twenty-five years ago, Myrtle and Charles Fillmore published Modern Thought magazine and unknowingly birthed a worldwide spiritual movement. They adopted the growing city of Kansas City, Missouri, as their home. They embraced the purpose of encouraging spiritual progress.

In 1889, the middle-aged couple found a new sense of resolve. Myrtle had experienced a healing after being diagnosed with tuberculosis. Prayer was central to Myrtle’s healing practice, directing life-affirming words to “every life-center” in her body. With daily meditation, Charles left behind the pain of a childhood hip injury. An increasing number of friends and acquaintances took notice.

Be!

Be!

We live in a world of light. We are ourselves light. ….

I have only to look … to taste … to feel, I have only to live—to know that the world is a work more wonderful than anything I can imagine it to be, anything I do imagine it to be! The wildest wonderment of all poets, dreamers, inventors, speculators that have ever lived is as nothing compared to the wonderment that is the world. The world is God’s wonderment, infinite intelligence compounding its infinity, the joy of eternity delighting in itself.

… For when I consider humanity, I catch a glimpse of God in whose image we are made.

Listen to life, and you shall hear the voice of life crying: Be!

What shall you be?

The Power of Joy

The Power of Joy

What is joy? In our process of maturing, we often think that joy is the result of happy circumstances. And it may be. I have seen a little rabbit run across the sidewalk and into the grass, and I had a feeling of joy.

We find joy in happy experiences and in our relationships with our loved ones. But joy is a deeper thing than just the result of happy circumstances. If it were only such a result, there would be times, many times, when we could not have joy; and in Truth, joy is always ours.

Confidentially

Written in 1939 for the Introduction to Unity’s Fifty Golden Years by Dana Gatlin

It is no easy task to write about oneself, especially when the call is for a personal1ife sketch, in which must appear those insignificant little things which are no different in the case of millions of others of the human family yet in which it is claimed that readers have particular interest.

"I winna blaw about mysel,
As ill I like my faults to tell,"

sang the Scotch plowboy when he found himself in the public eye; and this is probably the feeling we all have.

How I Found Health

How I Found Health

I have made what seems to me a discovery. I was very sick; I had all the ills of mind and body that I could bear. Medicine and doctors ceased to give me relief and I was in despair, until I found practical Christianity, I affirmed my beliefs, and I was healed. I did most of the healing myself, because I wanted the understanding for future use. This is how I made what I call my discovery:

Make Joy a Habit

Make Joy a Habit

Excerpt from the book Dare to Believe! (No longer in print)

Everyone wants to be happy. We know that the majority of people are eager to find happier ways of life.

Many persons are unhappy because they have not yet learned the art of living happily and joyously in spite of conditions and circumstances in their lives. But true happiness can be attained by anyone. Every one of us can learn to make joy a habit.

... It does not matter so much what our experiences are as how we react to them. This is what is definitely important to our wellbeing, to our health, happiness, and success.

What are your reactions to life? Have you analyzed them?

The New Growth of Spring

The New Growth of Spring

Spring urges us to plant some, grow some and bloom some. Even before the earth and air really hint at warmth, green shoots push up through the brown ground with encouragement. “You can do it,” they say. “Look at us!”

With all the newness unfolding around us, we may begin to wonder if there might not be something new we'd like to see in our lives. There may be a new skill we have always wanted to learn or a healthier habit we feel would improve our life. We may long for closer connections to those around us—our family, friends and co-workers. We may find ourselves looking for ways to contribute to our community and make a difference in the world. 

Living a Life That’s Not Just Good, But Amazing!

Living a Life Thats Not Just Good But Amazing!

According to Rev. Temple Hayes, CEO and senior minister of First Unity Campus in St. Petersburg, Florida, when we were children, the world we saw was the size of the world we lived in. For Hayes, who grew up in a strict Southern Baptist community in a small town in South Carolina, that world was one where “everyone thought the same and never asked questions about anything in their lives, including about God.” Nevertheless, she says, she always felt called to make a difference in the lives of others.

How are we Different?

How are we Different? by Charles Lelly

It seems that we are continually being deceived about the answer to the question, What is the good life? Those who have things to sell are vying for our attention with a staccato beat that is seemingly endless. Usually the message is, “If you accept my product, you will find the good life.”

But most of us can remember how we dearly longed for a doll or a bicycle and earnestly believed that if we acquired that wonderful “thing,” we would be content and eternally grateful. What a blow to our philosophy when the luster disappeared soon after the acquisition! Then we usually said, “If only I could have this new thing—then I would be happy.”

Pages